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On the move

What started with three people pursuing a (rather ambitious) plan, already developed into a team of 16 working on hardware development, software development, business development, operations, sales, marketing, finance and HR. A bigger team requires a bigger office. So after extending our current office a number of times it is now officially time to take a bigger step. Last Friday we moved into our new office!

No worries, we are still based at YES!Delft, we just moved into their new building where we have more space, a better view and a bigger workshop. So everything we need to work even harder on building our sustainable cloud!

Curious? Feel free to come by and check out our new spot!

About our teamcompany
Maaike Stoops
posted this November 14, 2016

Heating houses even more efficiently with computing power

Together with students Computer Science from Delft University of Technology (DUT), Nerdalize has developed a way to save even more energy!

Computer servers produce a lot of heat. In data centers, where a lot of servers are stacked together, it additionally costs a lot of energy to cool all these servers. In order to solve this, Nerdalize doesn’t place the computer servers in data centers, but in houses. Therefore the heat that comes off the server can be used to heat these houses. This way homeowners save up to 300 euros a year on heating and 3 tons of CO2 is saved per household per year. Additionally, companies save up 30 to 50% on cloud costs, because they do not have to pay for the overhead costs of building a data center.

This approach already causes a huge decrease in the energy usage. But it could be done even more efficient, is what DUT students Robert Carosi and Boris Mattijssen thought. For their bachelor final project in Computer Science, Robert and Boris found a way to utilize the heat that comes off the computer servers. Instead of using just any server to do a computation, they developed a way to always use the computer server in the house that needs the heat the most. For example in a place where it is a bit colder that day.

How does this work? Instead of doing one complete computation on one heater, this computation is cut up into smaller pieces. This way the computation can be divided over multiple houses. The pieces can then be computed in the house where the temperature is the lowest. When the wanted temperature is reached, the computation can be transferred to a house where the heat is still desired. This makes that the energy will always be used to its full potential.

Last Friday, the first of July 2016, Robert and Boris presented their project to family and friends. For their solution, they made smart use of Kubernetes, an open source system initiated by Google. This makes that not only energy can be saved, but our computer servers can run even faster and more efficient. A smart technological solution with a positive impact on the environment, that is what we love at Nerdalize!

About our heaterteam
Maaike Stoops
posted this July 1, 2016

The installation of a server heater, the Eneco eRadiator, in the living rooms of five families at different locations in the Netherlands this month, marks the start of an exclusive field test. The test is in line with Eneco’s strategy to develop into an energy partner of its customers by introducing innovative sustainable services.

Computer servers that perform calculations generate a lot of heat. By installing these servers in people’s homes instead of centralised large data centres, the generated heat can be used to heat these homes at no cost. The purpose of the test is to collect information on customer experience and to identify possible areas of improvement of the eRadiator.

This is the first time the design radiator with built-in server is installed in ordinary households. The servers shall perform complex calculations for a variety of companies and knowledge institutes, such as new medicine-related research for Leiden University Medical Centre.The Eneco eRadiator was developed by Nerdalize, a company that was founded in 2013 by the three initiators of the idea with the aim to further develop the server heater concept. Nerdalize is located at YES!Delft, Europe’s largest tech-incubator. Eneco believes that the eRadiator offers a range of possibilities and has acquired an interest in the start-up.

A study carried out in cooperation with the Leiden Institute of Advanced Computing Science shows that companies and institutions that require a lot of processing power can reduce their costs in the area of accommodation and cooling of datacentres by 30 to 55% with the concept developed by Nerdalize. There are also environmental benefits, because the same energy is used for two different purposes: computation and heating.

It will take at the least to the end of the year to complete the field test. Eneco and Nerdalize will use the results to determine if and how the eRadiator can be made available to a larger number of customers. Interested parties who wish to stay informed of the latest developments can register by sending an email to eRadiator@eneco.com.

eRadiator